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Anyone using bone conduction headphones

Discussion in 'General Chat and Gossip' started by Stew, Jul 29, 2020 at 7:22 AM.

  1. Stew

    Stew Member

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    I have a hankering to get some to add to the inner ear and over ear collection.

    Anyone use a set? Any good?
     
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  2. noddy

    noddy Subscribed Member

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    Looks like its down to you this one, Stew.

    Get them. Review them. We'll all have them by the end of next week.
     
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  3. 5teep

    5teep Subscribed Member

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    I have a bluetooth set, they work ok but are not very comfortable to wear for longer periods because there needs to be some pressure on the bone for them to work properly (they feel tight on the head). They also tend to entertain anyone around me as well, the volume needed to pass through bone is higher than you might think.
    Worth trying an inexpensive set before splashing what can be quite a lot of cash.
     
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  4. Stew

    Stew Member

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    I hadn’t thought of the pressure side of things - makes sense though!

    I’m generally quite happy with my other headphones but just liked the idea of them. Volume is definitely not something I had thought of.

    As it is, think I’ll be getting a robot vacuum instead. :D Borrowed one from work for a few days and it works well in my house.
     
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  5. MaC

    MaC Moderator Staff Member

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    This is going to sound weird, but if I press on my cheekbone just above my jaw, then it's not perfect, but I can actually hear my own voice.
    Mostly I hear a kind of shattered echo rather than speech.
    Son1 has been suggesting that we get me a pair of these headphones for a while, he thinks it might make telephone conversation much easier. At present, for most folks, I get three words out of ten. The rest is 'fill in the gaps', and yeah, that's sometimes a confusion wrapped up in a conundrum.
    We've been using Facetime since lockdown, but even on a screen in front of me, with two of them and moving around, I can't always lipread enough to feel I've got hold of the conversation. He said that the bone conduction earphones can be plugged into my laptop and it might help there too.

    I am seriously tempted, but I don't know anyone who actually has them, or know how to figure out if they're any blooming good or if one brand is much better than another.

    Watching the thread with interest :D
     
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  6. Stew

    Stew Member

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    I suspect the tech for leisure users has come from developments for those with hearing loss. It makes sense as to how it works.

    In your situation, I would be on it. At what price point, I don’t know!
     
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  7. MaC

    MaC Moderator Staff Member

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    A sister in law of my Uncle was very deaf. C. had real problems with very damaged ear drums, and at times she couldn't wear her hearing aids. Instead she wore a 'bone phone' headband. When wearing it she would put the phone (old fashioned handset) against her chest just below her collar bones, and she said she could hear every word. I have no idea how that worked :?

    I wasn't always deaf, and sometimes I get very lucky and I meet someone whose voice is at just the right level and I hear perfectly :)
    I have lost bands of hearing, unfortunately it appears to be mostly where speech is heard.
    I have become very quiet. I cannot hear how loud my voice is, so rather than shout, I seem to have subconsciously become even quieter.
    I miss the ease of conversation, and the recent compulsary mask wearing is making it a nightmare.

    Sod's law. Can't do much about it.

    The Audiology Units are closed for the present too. They're only doing basic replacements if someone's aid dies, and supplying batteries. Otherwise I'd ask them about the bone conduction thing.

    M
     
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  8. noddy

    noddy Subscribed Member

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    I had some students doing research into why people don't much like the sound of their own recorded voices. They thought that it was because you lose the bass resonances in your body, which no one else can hear. So when you hear playback, your voice sounds tinny and insunstantial compared to all the corporeal nuances that you hear when you are speaking yourself. They made a little software that included a bunch of bass notes and eigentones and which produced an approximation of your spoken voice as it sounds to you so that others could hear it. Very fun it was, and got all philosophical about structures of self-loathing implied by not liking the sound of your own voice.
     
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  9. MaC

    MaC Moderator Staff Member

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    That makes a lot of sense. Touching the bone gives a resonance, a depth, to my voice that otherwise I don't hear.

    Is that why folk singers put a finger in their ear ?
     
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  10. CaptainBeaky

    CaptainBeaky Subscribed Member

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    That's so you can hear your own voice over everyone else's, so you can stay in tune.
    Big stage performers use in-ear monitors to get a specific sound balance (performer sets the mix going to their monitor, sound tech sets the mix that the audience hears) and to protect their hearing. Acoustic folkies do it by sticking a finger in their ear!
     
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  11. Brian T

    Brian T Subscribed Member

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    I have an aural cognitive dysfunction. Most people speak loudly enough and clearly enough
    but they make do NOT match any words that I know in my head. I sit in silence, trying to guess the words.
    Background noise is the killer, no words I recall. Louder isn't better, just becomes really loud noise.

    These jack-ass masks underscore how much lip-reading I've been doing. When I'm out, I don't want to try to talk to anyone.
    Some people with really excellent hearing insist that I need to spend many thousands of dollars on hearing aids.
    How the hell would they know what works and what doesn't?

    Oddly enough, let me ring you up on the land-line telephone.
    Almost every voice is almost 100% comprehensible. What the hello is that all about?

    Where would I shop for these bone-conduction headphones?
     
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  12. noddy

    noddy Subscribed Member

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    My son has that, or something those words would fit. Pest, isn't it? You have all my sympathies.
     
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  13. MaC

    MaC Moderator Staff Member

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    I knew I was lip reading, and I get a lot too from facial expression. I don't catch intonation any more but people are animated and use their faces to express emotion too.
    Masks are a hard thing for me. I'll deal with it, but it makes me even more unlikely to engage with others.

    I used to talk to literally thousands of people over a weekend :) I made a lot of money doing it which rather implies that I was good at it. I still get asked to come and work, but it just became a stress filled time, and I think I made the right decision to call it a day.
    I miss people though.
    It's easy to talk 'to' people, but I can't easily talk 'with' people any more. Not people who I have no idea where they're coming from, what interests and skills and experience they have, and I can't hear children clearly at all.

    I think hearing aids are brilliant, if you can use them. I can't have them in my ears now. My ear canals swell up and close and since they're pretty narrow anyway it becomes painful too.
    I wish I could wear them as easily as Mike does. They don't give me all sound back, I have nerve damage that has lost me bands of sound, but they kind of enhance what hearing I do have and I get more than just shattered whispers.

    Jamie's been suggesting the bone things for a while. I think I really do need to spend some time researching them.

    M
     
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  14. Brian T

    Brian T Subscribed Member

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    If I wore an unobtrusive microphone and a audio processor and headphones,
    that can't make me look outstanding in a sea of other people listening to radio/music/etc.

    I would really like to know what the landline telephone is doing for audio processing for me.
     
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  15. RickDastardly

    RickDastardly Member

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    Bone conduction sets will help for hearing loss if it is due (at least in part) to problems in the outer or middle ear canal. Basically if you have conductive hearing loss (or partial/mixed). They need a functioning cochlea and auditory nerve, so are useless to me because it's just my nerve that packed up.

    If you're a sneaky-shooty type the bone conduction comms headsets are great for maintaining situational awareness. As to music listening headsets though, there's not much that makes me want them really (even not counting my SSHL): Limited bass, the wearer can't really do anything too 'active' because they can shift off the bone, and they tend to distort at higher volumes. I'll stick to my Audioquest Nightowl headphones.

    @Brian T, Telephones (POTS)... have a very limited bandwidth of 400Hz to 3.3kHz. These days that bandwidth is likely to be sharply limited too, so practically nothing outside that gets heard. I'm not sure if modern systems do any compression on it (making the volume more constant); probably not. Perhaps that's why you hear/comprehend it better; there is nothing in the audio other than human speech frequencies.
     
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  16. Brian T

    Brian T Subscribed Member

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    I found some "bone conduction" headphones. Wireless. From what sort of a broadcaster, I have no idea.
    Titanium, they wrap round the back of your head and hang on your ears.
    The audio parts press on your cheek bones.

    I think what I'm looking for is some kind of a speech frequency clipper with a noise-cancelling function.
     
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  17. Nice65

    Nice65 Subscribed Member

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    I looked into bone mics for my dad who is now very deaf. He’s 91 and has always had an ear for good music, film, ballet, concerts and conversation, it’s ever so sad to see him struggle to understand and constantly mishear things. I thought I’d found the answer, but alas, it is the aural nerve and connections between the complex bones in his ears that are not working. I got him some Bluetooth sound cancelling headphones which means he can at least watch a film without any external interference. Even running the tap, the washing machine, or worst of all the twittering of a restaurant leave him in a white noise where understanding and communication are impossible.
     
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  18. noddy

    noddy Subscribed Member

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    [​IMG]

    Actually, I'd give a leg to have a go on these
     
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  19. Stew

    Stew Member

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    It’s hard for me to justify but the nagging feeling was there. I guess that constant quest for better! If it had been a resounding ‘they’re great’ then I would be on it but as it is, I’ll wait until I find someone I know with them to give them a borrow.

    I use two pairs of other headphones on a fairly a daily basis.

    These for desk work to shut out the world with the noise cancelling, or any other activity where I’m not too active and they’re not going to get covered in paint, etc.

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Sony-MDR-Z...celling headphones sony&qid=1585764081&sr=8-2

    The cheapest noise cancelling set with a wire that I could find. They work well enough for me. Call of Duty mobile is great with them, especially when you flick the noise cancelling on.


    The other set is these:

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/aw/d/B01564J0LO?psc=1&ref=ppx_pop_mob_b_asin_title

    I’m on my third set in five years. Each time the cable has been damaged I just ordered a new lot. Cheap enough to not worry about getting mucky, comfortable to the extent of barely noticing they’re there, secure, don’t fully block out the world so safe-ish. I’m wearing them right now and just about to fit some plasterboard in a ceiling, I’ll be painting in bit, a bit of sawing, etc. When I pop off to chat to a contractor they’ll tuck in a pocket.

    Really with that combo I can’t complain but a wire can be annoying, especially as my iPhone is now one that doesn’t have a standard audio jack - I’m here with an adaptor in! Occasionally cables snag which is annoying and I can’t help but think that going for a run would be better without the cable
     
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  20. RickDastardly

    RickDastardly Member

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    I forgot I had these; haven't used them for ages:

    [​IMG]

    (click the pic - it's a link to Amazon)

    They have been updated since I bought them. Bluetooth, comfortable earpads, micro-USB charging, they fold up small enough to go in a pocket, and relatively inexpensive.

    I got them because I got irritated by the wire on my IEMs in the gym and having to have the player near/on me. Also, after using IEMs for years without a problem they started to make my ears hurt after an hour or so. Being wireless did make it much less hassle, and I found they stayed in place OK even on fast versaclimber sessions. The sound quality was nothing like my superfi5 pros but the convenience in the gym or when DIYing was worth the trade.
     
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