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Being prepared for the second wave.

Discussion in 'General Chat and Gossip' started by Woody Girl, Jul 14, 2020.

  1. Woody Girl

    Woody Girl Member

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    I've been buying lots of tinned and dried goods proir to lockdown and kept adding at every opportunity I get.
    Today for instance I came across a tin of tomatoes 2.1/2lb for £3 in the newsagent when I popped in as the shop was empty on my pottle around today.
    Now never in a month of Sundays can i use that in one go but my mindset has become so tuned to get it when you can, l bought it.
    It has a three year shelf life stamped on the tin so there is plenty of time to work out how to use it. Probably freeze the rest when I do eventualy open it.
    In effect I'm preparing to be locked down again for at least six weeks or more.
    I even added jelly babies to my stash of goodies.
    What I'm wandering is anyone else thinking like this?
    Or am I being too proactive?
    Not that I'll stop doing this mind.
    People basically laughed when I did this pre lockdown.. but I wasn't worrying about delivery slots or bog roll when everyone else was scrambling around for them.
     
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  2. beachlover

    beachlover Moderator Staff Member

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    I don’t think it’s at all unreasonable. Before we downsized and had more space, locking down, losing income (as we did at one time) or even utility cuts would have been easy to cope with. The real OCD bit was keeping lists of what was in store and rotating it out before it’s expiry date and checking it wasn’t damaged or going off (I had ring pull lids on a few cans and tins fail and stink the place out when I opened the plastic storage bin they were in!).
    My technique was just to add a few tins and dried foodstuffs to everyday shopping as it was amazing how quickly they build up. In our present place there was little room for storage and we probably only had about a fortnight’s worth in the pantry and storage bins when it became apparent we were going to need a lot more in April. I’m now looking at bringing forward a plan to fit decent steps to the loft space and also putting proper boarding in the loft.
    I’m still buying extra stuff as well as fuel, candles detergent, bleach and the like as well as keeping an eye open for bargains and seed saving.
    My greatest success though after years of pisstaking from my two daughters is that both now have started stocking up, growing some veg and generally prepping.
     
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  3. Woody Girl

    Woody Girl Member

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    I think that's great.
    I can see food prices and the prices of other items going sky high soon. I've already noticed on a few things that has happened. A few pence here one week another few pence a couple of weeks later and suddenly a tin of beans is £1 or more for instance.
    To my mind it makes sense to buy as much as I can now.
    Even things like underwear and socks.
    If we do have the massive depression with millions out of work and possibly cuts in pensions or benefits it could be a realy hard time for all.
    Glad your getting the younger generations involved too.
     
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  4. MaC

    MaC Moderator Staff Member

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    Despite the fact that Scotland is doing well at knocking this disease down and out, our government is talking about tackling two fronts. Making sure that this one doesn't have a resurgance, and the expectation that Winter time might well bring it back again.

    I always keep a good pantry, I always keep my store cupboard well plenished, but I've been quietly squirreling away the stuff that is expected to surge in price, the stuff that's not going to be easily available, according to the food pundits.
    So, good vanilla ( have you seen the price of vanilla pods these days ????) If you can get paste cheaply, it's worth soaking it in a jar with vodka and just leaving it alone there. It's a great way to make vanilla essence and easy to use to flavour sugar in the jar of caster for baking.
    Ginger, good ginger. I use stem ginger and crystallised ginger. GFson1 finds the Scottish 'obsession' with ginger surprising. Normally it's used in seasoning she says, then she comes here and we bake with it, we make jam with it, we even add it to carrots :roll: and make chocolates with it. Anyway, the ginger jars are full :) and I have more stashed. It literally keeps for years and is still good.

    Coffee, good coffee, and decent tea. The tea gardens have problems and the price of good tea is going up.
    Dried fruits and nuts and seeds. They're almost all imported, they all keep well, and they are labour intensive to produce.
    We eat a lot of fruit and nuts, so I have quietly thought it through and bought the freshest I can find. I keep on top of that simply because they're a household staple for us.
    Same with spices. Herbs too if I can't grow them myself. Basically I'm just using up and refreshing my stock, and adding a bit.
    Good olive oil is another one worth stashing.

    British farming is good for dairy, for poultry and eggs, for meat and fish, so apart from some tins of dried milk, carnation, condensed, and a decent selection of meaty ones for Himself, I haven't bothered much with that.
    I do keep extra butter and cheese in the freezer anyway. Eggs for baking freeze well too, just use ice cube trays and then pop the icy lumps into a bag. I had a go at canning butter, so far it's a success, but I can't really see it being necessary, it was more to see if I could do it properly :)
    Tempted to try canning bacon for Himself, just to see how it does.

    Flour; I've sussed out how much we use rather than just buying as the boxes get low and not thinking about how much, how often. Doves Farm sell catering sized packs and it's fresh and it's been a blessing, so that's the GF free stuff sorted.
    Yeast was a pain to find last time, and is only now becoming regularly available. Tins or sealed packs of it, and keep it in the pantry is the best bet apparently. I think if push came to shove I'd just brew it up and keep some live and use that. It's not rocket science, if I can keep kefir happy, I can keep yeast going.
    Rice is something to watch they say. If there are problems abroad then they'll need their crops themselves, and it doesn't grow here.

    Sugar; the UK can produce enough from beets, but we don't really do good brown sugar for baking, so I'll watch that too.

    I have bought more tins than usual of things like fruits, ready cooked beans, etc.,
    I also use stock powder, Marigold, Vecon paste, and Nutritional Yeast, so we bought in bulk and sussed out where to order from again if it's needed in a hurry.

    This time around it took two months before they had the shelves re-stocked and folks calm enough to buy reasonably, when it came to disposable paper products, so I've kept that in mind, and that Winter weather lasts longer than three months really. I've bought extras of all the other cleaning stuff, from bleach to fairy liquid and Ecover, to toothpaste and shampoo, etc.,
    I'm more thinking if I don't want us to be out shopping and I can't get any deliveries. So, enough, replacements, and a bit extra, just in case.

    I already have and keep refreshed all of the dried legumes and grains we use. Popcorn was really hard to find this time round, as was the ground cornmeal I use. I use smash for baking things like tattie scones, and it disappeared off the shelves too, so I've built back up and I'll over stock before Winter. It keeps for years if you keep the tubs sealed inside plastic bags.

    Tomato pastes, tins and tubes and dried, disappeared from the supermarket shelves too. The tubes last better than the cans if you pack them tidily in an airtight box where they can't get bashed around. They don't rust, unlike the cans. An opened tube keeps well in the fridge door too, so you don't need to use it all at once.

    That really only leaves salad stuff and vegetables.
    I keep a vegetable bin (big black bin, insulated with peat) for spuds, carrots, parsnips, beetroots, turnips, etc., and they're all grown in the UK.
    Salads aren't really grown here in Winter. I admit I am tempted to pester the menfolks to turn the old aquarium into a salad cropping thing for me with appropriate light fittings. Home grown fresh basil, coriander, syboes, etc., in the dark of Winter would be rather nice.
    Sprouting seeds I will make sure I have a extra good stock of before Winter.

    The very last thing is oatmeal :)
    Surprised no one that, did it ? :D
    It's everything from breakfast to oatcakes, from gingerbread to coating stuff, from cranachan to muesli. Good food :)

    I thought it was just me, but GFSon1 is quietly adding onto her groceries every time she shops too. Growing up she says the family did that every year anyway since they grew every fruit and vegetable they ate.

    Power ? I can't do anything about that. I have enough clothing and bedding that everyone can be warm even if there's no heat. I have fuel enough to cook with on my camping stoves, etc., and I have a woodland on my door step and I can cook on a fire. LED lights abound, and I still have two boxes of half a gross each of power cut candles from the 1970's......so with that as a reminder, make sure you think it through and buy what you'll actually use, because these candles have been kept, 'just in case', for longer than some of you have been alive, and we haven't needed them yet.
    Here's hoping we still don't need them now either :D

    M
     
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  5. beachlover

    beachlover Moderator Staff Member

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    Yep, I’d agree with all of that. Some years ago I became a member of “Ludlow Survivors Group” Forums and there were a few really knowledgeable and experienced folks on there (British Red from t’other channel being one of them who is now pretty much living the philosophy for real). Sadly it also included some oddballs (RickUK and others) and what killed it for me was an odd couple on the Island who wanted to meet up and share resources. I did consider it so that if ever it was necessary I’d know who to raid, but in the end I left and the forum has now folded.
    I think that apart from stockpiling, it’s also important to plan for wider difficulties in the face of a depression and its bedfellow, crime. I play down any talk of prepping and don’t flash about anything of value, as well as having lately started bantering with the twenty something druggies in the graveyard. Knowing who’s who, being seen as “alright” and not worth troubling, with the option of engaging with them to obtain resources if it all goes to ratshit.
     
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  6. Oldtimer

    Oldtimer Member

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    Having been a war baby, I was brought up with rationing and shortages, so keeping reserves has always been normal. We have also been very poor and learned not to waste anything.

    Everything Beachlover and Mary have said makes perfect sense to me. What I have found this time round is now bizarre some of the shortages have been. Loo paper??!! Guessing what to stockpile is difficult.

    I have found what some folk think essential endlessly amusing. I've cut my own hair for 40 years so the barber has not been a problem. I can get my fingernails varnished now but will have to wait to get my eyebrows threaded!



    P.S. What on earth is eyebrow threading? Actually, don't answer, I really don't give a monkey's.
     
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    Last edited: Jul 14, 2020
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  7. Woody Girl

    Woody Girl Member

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    I'm glad that others here are thinking ahead.
    I bought lots of candles from ikea but wish I'd bought a few more boxes.
    I used about half a box during a couple of power cuts last winter.
    I have some gas lamps and gas but could do with a bit more I think.
    I collect twigs all year round for kindling and also pine cones large and small so there is enough to get me through for a couple of months of no electric.
    I'm also starting to order coal again just a couple of bags at a time for the multi fuel burner in case logs run short or prices go up.
    I realy need a proper log store.
    But location is a problem. The only viable space is where the coal bunker is.
    I've turned all the balls of cotton I have into knitted flannels and cleaning cloths, and am in the process of cutting up into quarters and hemming old tea towels.
    I've made socks and jumpers hats and gloves during lockdown so I'm fine for that sort of thing.
    All the odds and ends are knitted into squares to make another blanket.
    I still have a few holes here and there but I think I'll manage to get everything sorted soon.
    Today I managed to get some scaffolding planks so I can renew all my raised bed edges and make them a bit longer and deeper too.
    Food waste is going into the compost bin rather than out for collection. I need another one, so I've got to find some pallets from somewhere.
    I now have a great selection of seeds by buying home farmer or kitchen garden magazine each month. You get a lot of free seeds each month and those I don't need or want can be swopped for other things I might need.
    All in all I think I've got most bases covered.. but there is bound to be something I've missed somewhere I bet!
     
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  8. RickDastardly

    RickDastardly Member

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    Been there, done that! Mine was a tin of mackerel and was stacked deep on a shelf in the freezer/laundry room. The entire room stank to high heaven.

    I'm still keeping my stock level up, rotating slowly through three months' worth of tins and packets and replacing them. I don't expect another shortage like last time, but just in case... plus it holds off the price rises for a few months. That's better than any interest rates the banks are offering on the money.

    Now my mother... even before covid (since the threat of Brexit in fact) she's kept such a stock of toilet rolls, baked beans, flour etc. that she could stand a siege for a year. Largely to counteract the rising prices and falling interest rates.

    Funny thing is, she got the habit of 'prepping' from me!
     
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  9. jaggededge

    jaggededge Member

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    You do realise it's 2020 and not 1920. Seriously though it's always good to have a reserve but don't let it get obsessive. Like I said it's 2020.
     
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  10. MaC

    MaC Moderator Staff Member

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    Ikea candles are pretty carp. If you can get hold of Price's candles cheaply, I'd recommend buying them instead :)
    They do Nightlights, which burn for at least 7 hours, six for under three quid last time I bought them.
    Their tealights, etc., are really good quality too, and they smoke an awful lot less than the Ikea ones do.
    https://www.prices-candles.co.uk/product/sentinel-nightlights-pack-of-6/

    If you join their email list, they do special offers that are well worth having. Postage is reasonable, and if the
    order is over £40 it's free. Me and two neighbours make up an order among ourselves and get free postage :)

    M
     
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  11. beachlover

    beachlover Moderator Staff Member

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    A quick look around the world shows how fast things go from 2020 to prehistoric let alone 1920. Just sayin’ :)
     
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  12. MaC

    MaC Moderator Staff Member

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    I'm just a housewife these days :) I like being practical. I'm not obsessive, just I like my cupboards well stocked, and I do like a bargain :)
     
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  13. ElThomsono

    ElThomsono Moderator Staff Member

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    My biggest concern is large redundancies and not being able to pay the mortgage. A few tins of tomatoes and some tealights won't go far in that situation.
     
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  14. Woody Girl

    Woody Girl Member

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    I usualy make sure I can survive a few weeks of snow or flooding as we can get cut off here and have often been so.
    So I've just kept everything going but at double what i normaly do and plugging holes as they become apparent. I've bought a few strange things but they are usable anyway.
    Solar shower and a water filter
    A couple more head torches to make sure I have one in every room including the loo.
    Extra batteries.... it's amazing how quickly even a small radio will run them down. I do have handcrank radios with solar.
    Solar doesn't work at night and wind up is a pain!
    I don't have tv so I realy rely on the radio.
     
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  15. beachlover

    beachlover Moderator Staff Member

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    My youngest daughter is potentially in a similar position. She has her own house and lives on her own. Worst comes to the worst we would probably look at combining funds to make it work. The kids and I have been technically homeless in the past and managed, but it’s a real pisser when you’ve worked so hard to get a home together and then face the threat of losing it for no fault of your own. :sad03:
     
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  16. BorderReiver

    BorderReiver Moderator Staff Member

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    There's a rabid Tory government in Westminster, a global pandemic on the go and we're cutting ourselves off from the EU: 1920 had nothing on what we're heading for.
     
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  17. Woody Girl

    Woody Girl Member

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    I'll be ok as long as I can pay rent which though tight sometimes I can manage ok.
    I do feel for those with a mortgage and job insecurity as it is.
    My daughter partner and two kids are in that situation with only two years or so of mortgage paid under her belt.
     
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  18. MaC

    MaC Moderator Staff Member

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    I use the touch led lights in the loos and bedrooms, cupboards, etc., They're battery powered but fasten onto the walls. Quite good for when up in the night but don't want a lot of light to wake up too far to go back to sleep too.

    I have been looking at the heat powered battery chargers, like this
    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Robens-Woo...t=&hvlocphy=1007403&hvtargid=pla-807196858953

    Stephen had one years ago at one of our meet ups and at the time I had no real use for it since I rarely camped away long enough to need it, but if I can find something practical at a reasonable price, I'd be tempted.

    M
     
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  19. jaggededge

    jaggededge Member

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    always look on the bright side eh
     
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  20. ElThomsono

    ElThomsono Moderator Staff Member

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    Aye, I think there will be many in that boat and they can't all be as lucky.

    Renting a room out will likely be more commonplace as people are seeking income and others are trying to cut costs, we've always done it and the additional income really helps. With us having kids the plan is to knock it on the head soon but if one of us is out of work it would be straight back on the table.
     
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